CannaBusiness Advisory

  • Recent OCIE Risk Alert Demonstrates SEC’s Continued Focus on Private Fund AdvisersAugust 06, 2020

    The staff (the “Staff”) of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (“OCIE”) recently issued a Risk Alert focused on certain key compliance issues for registered investment advisers that manage private equity funds or hedge funds (collectively, “private fund advisers”). OCIE’s Risk Alert highlights certain common deficiencies the Staff has observed, and its publication demonstrates the Staff’s continued focus on regulating private fund advisers. For purposes of this Cannabis Business Advisory blog, private fund advisers and investors alike in the cannabis space are advised to carefully take note of this Risk Alert, especially given the already enhanced scrutiny of the industry.

    The Staff emphasizes three general areas of deficiencies OCIE has identified in examinations of private fund advisers: (1) inadequate disclosure of conflicts of interest, (2) inaccurate allocations and disclosures of fees and expenses, and (3) failure to properly maintain, establish and enforce policies and procedures relating to material non-public information (“MNPI”).

    Conflicts of Interest Disclosures

    The Staff underscores the antifraud provisions in Section 206 of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the “Advisers Act”).  In particular, the Staff cautions advisers who are subject to these antifraud provisions to eliminate or otherwise make “full and … Keep reading

  • Webinar: Automated Cannabis Banking PlatformsAugust 05, 2020

    Scott Moskol and Katrina Skinner joined Mike Kennedy of Green Check Verified, Ryan Canin of DocFox, Adam Crabtree of NCS Analytics, and Tony Repanich of Shield Compliance for a panel discussion on automated cannabis banking solutions.

    Click here to watch the full webinar.Keep reading

  • Does the SAFE Banking Act Still Have a Chance?July 23, 2020

    FinCEN’s most recent information regarding financial institutions providing services to cannabis-related businesses (“CRBs”) indicates a slight decline in the overall number of depository institutions providing such services during the first quarter of 2020. FinCEN speculated that the decline might be short-term and attributable to late Suspicious Activity Report filings. Regardless, the number of financial institutions actively banking cannabis has stayed steady for over a year. Although there may be many reasons preventing new entrants from coming into the space, one of the biggest hesitations relates to the Senate’s failure to pass the SAFE Banking Act, or some version of it. As the November elections near, it may seem even more unlikely that the SAFE Banking Act will finally become law; however, with the GOP controlled Senate preparing its own version of a second coronavirus stimulus package, there is still a chance that the Senate could include provisions of the SAFE Banking Act similar to those included in the HEROES Act passed by the House in May. Strategically and practically, it would make sense.

    Since it passed in September 2019, the SAFE Banking Act has been stalled in the Senate’s banking committee led by Sen. Mike Crapo of Idaho. In … Keep reading

  • Micro-Webinar: Let’s Talk Cannabis BankingJuly 17, 2020

    Frank A. Segall and Scott Moskol, Co-Chairs of the Cannabis Business & Law Advisory group, facilitated a discussion with Katrina Skinner on the cannabis industry’s most pressing banking issues for businesses and financial institutions.

    Click here to watch the full webinar.… Keep reading

  • Lighting Up Lobbying for Cannabis CompaniesJuly 15, 2020

    With recent COVID 19-related mandates, such as the shelter-in-place orders or social distancing requirements, many businesses and cannabis companies have reached out to the governor’s office or other state and local officials with attempts to influence relief legislation or to request an industry-wide exception to a regulation. Did you know these types of activities may be considered lobbying and in some jurisdictions require registration as a lobbyist?

    When analyzing whether you or your business may be lobbying, it’s helpful to keep in mind a broad and basic definition of lobbying. Lobbying in a nutshell could be considered any act that attempts to influence a government official or employee regarding a government action or issue. The challenge of lobby laws is that there may be up to three layers – federal, state, and local. Federal lobby laws are covered by The Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995, however, there is not a universal definition of lobbying on the state and local level, and each state, city, municipality, or another local area may adopt its own definition and registration requirements. Therefore, as a matter of regulatory compliance, cannabis companies should have an awareness of the lobby laws where they operate and do … Keep reading

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